Attorneys

Jason D. Wyman

Jason D. Wyman

  • Associate

Jason Wyman concentrates his practice in bankruptcy and creditors’ rights with particular concentration in representing mortgage lenders in bankruptcy cases.  Admitted to practice in South Carolina and Georgia,  Jason is a graduate of Clemson University and a magna cum laude graduate of the Charleston School of Law.  While in law school, Jason worked as a Legal Writing Teaching Fellow and served as the Senior Articles Editor of the Charleston Law Review.  He received the ABA-ALI Scholarship Award and CALI awards in Legal Research and Writing, Sports Law, and Equity.

Education

  • Charleston School of Law, J.D., magna cum laude, 2011
  • Clemson University, B.A., 2006

Memberships

  • South Carolina Bar
  • State Bar of Georgia

Awards & Recognition

ABA-ALI Scholarship
CALI (American Jurisprudence) Award:
–    Legal Research and Writing I, Fall 2008
–    Sports Law, Fall 2010
–    Equity, Spring 2011

Publications, Speeches & Seminars

South Carolina Bankruptcy Law Association, 27th Annual Seminar,  Ethics of Working with Pro Se Debtors and Litigants

2017 South Carolina Bar Convention, Using the Portal to Strike Gold – A discussion of South Carolina Bankruptcy’s Court Loss Mitigation program

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